PING: THE RESCUE OF EDEN by Stuart Avery Gold

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PING: THE RESCE OF EDEN :

An eco-parable about climate change and an inner responsibility to the outside world

In the new book, Ping the frog is troubled by disturbing indications of growing imbalances in Eden Pond that compel him to embark on a crucial journey to help guide a stricken world back to the path of harmony. PING: THE RESCUE OF EDEN is an enchanting cautionary parable for this time and all time. The PING series has been translated in more than 20 languages and inspires audiences to integrate practices and principles to overcome the obstacles that hold them back, and shows the limitless possibilities that can result from taking a leap of faith.

Learn more about the books at http://www.pingthebook.com

My Thoughts:

The first thing that enters my mind now that I have read this book is IT IS AWESOME. It is about Ping, the frog who sets out in the hope of saving his pond and finding out what is affecting with the environment and nature. Through Pings journey, we are given an insight into his thinking and the conversations he has with some of the other animals he encounters on the way. We are also given an insight into what they think of humans and how our actions are affecting the environment.

The author has subtly conveyed to us the consequences of our actions and shows us that there is more to life than just that person without sounding like he is preaching. The simpleness of the story and the way it is written will make us pause and think, reevaluating our thoughts and ideas. This book will encourage the reader to do something about their life instead of just being laid back about everything. It will inspire the reader to face challenges in their lives with their head held high.

A book worth reading, Pings adventures are inspiring and though provoking in a subtle, non-preaching manner. This should be read by everyone at-least once to stop and evaluate their beliefs and push themselves in a direction of self growth and discovery.

2 thoughts on “PING: THE RESCUE OF EDEN by Stuart Avery Gold

  1. May I send you a digital copy of my novel, Reluctant Intern, to read and possibly review on your blog?

    Description:

    Addison Wolfe never wanted to be a physician. He wants to be an astronaut. NASA turned down his application, forcing him to seek employment as a doctor. The problem with obtaining a physician’s license is the need to complete an internship to acquire one. Wolfe finds himself in an undesirable rotating internship in a very busy public hospital. Inexplicably, the Director of Medical Education seems to have developed an instantaneous dislike of him and the remainder of the internship class. Another mystery is why an attractive female physician expresses a romantic interest in him on the first day of internship.

    “The absolute worst time to go to a teaching hospital as a patient is the month of July. Recent medical school graduates, known as doctors, start their real training on July first. They don’t know anything. They don’t get any sleep. They are underpaid and overworked. Their stress is at catastrophic levels. Is it any wonder they make mistakes?” – Anonymous

    “In local news today,” the reporter said, “state and federal authorities are in the process of taking into custody the entire intern class at University Hospital in Jacksonville. Officials cited the number of deaths attributed to this class as the reason. It seems that wrong doses of medications, inappropriate surgeries, failure to diagnose lethal conditions, and other mistakes have led to hundreds of deaths….”

    “The overdose?” Wolfe asked.
    “Yes,” Dr. Rubel replied, “that will be her legal cause of death, of course. The real cause of death was the autopsy. Barbiturate overdose, followed by refrigeration outside and then here in pathology, slowed her metabolism down. She was actually alive when they started the autopsy. The flexing of her limbs when the saw touched her brain happened because of nerve conduction, brain to extremities. But it was too late; we cannot put her back together. A hard lesson for those poor boys to learn. You, too, gentlemen. It is also true for those who are clinically dead from exposure or drowning. Remember this: a patient is never dead until he is warm and dead. Don’t forget that!”

    The senior resident started his description, “EMS responded to a report of a cardiac arrest at 1:07 a.m. in Junior’s Topless Bar, on East Bay Street….”
    Figueroa again jumped to his feet. “What is this, a bad joke?” he asked. “Two EMTs walk into a bar…. Let’s be reasonable, guys. The most likely reason for needing a paramedic in a bar at 1 a.m. is a knifing or a gun shot wound, not a heart attack.”
    The autopsy and x-rays were condemning. The thirty-nine year old, black male had no history of heart disease. No medical history of any kind. He did have a bullet entrance wound to the back of his head with no exit, bullet still in his brain.

    The patient was a massively obese woman who complained of a headache. The intern knew only that she was complaining of a headache and had requested aspirin. Extremely busy, and assuming the nurse would let him know if it were not a good idea to give the patient aspirin, he quickly flipped to the order page and signed the order that had been written by the nurse. Figueroa asked the intern if he had talked with the patient. No. Had he examined the patient? No. Had he even skimmed the chart? He had not. He asked if he knew what allergies the patient had. The intern did not know. At the time he approved the order for aspirin, did he realize the patient was on warfarin, another clotting inhibitor? No. Did he know that aspirin also inhibited platelets and clot formation? Yes. Did he know the patient had a history of blood clots? No. Did he suppose that a blood clot in someone’s brain, or a ruptured berry aneurysm in the same area might cause headaches? Yes, he knew that. The autopsy pictures revealed stenosed carotid arteries, two small clots in the patient’s brain, and massive bleeding from a ruptured berry aneurysm.

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