In conversation with Megan Cyrulewski

In conversation with Megan Cyrulewski. She has written her memoir, Who Am I? How My Daughter Taught Me to Let Go and Live Again, which was released on August 2, 2014.  The book is about her journey into post-partum depression, anxiety disorder, panic attacks, stays in the psych ward, divorce, domestic violence, law school, how she managed to graduate from law school and a beautiful little girl who emerged from all of the chaos.  There are two extremely important messages she would like to get across:

One:  Postpartum Depression still has a negative stigma attached to it.  Women shouldn’t be afraid to seek treatment if they feel something is wrong.

Two:  Emotional abuse is a form of domestic violence and is not to be taken lightly.  It took 10 strangers in a group therapy session in the hospital psych ward to tell me that I was in an emotionally abusive marriage and that I needed to get out for the sake of my daughter.

I will be posting my review of her memoir soon. Here is what Megan has to say:

  • What inspired you to start writing?

Everyone kept telling me that I should write a book about everything that had happened. I love to write so I figured, why not?

  • Tell us a little about yourself.

I am from Michigan – born and raised.   I have a beautiful, intelligent, but sometimes sassy, little girl named Madelyne Rose. I’m an attorney specializing in court mediation but I’m also an author. I’m working on my second book – crime fiction.

 

  • How did writing your memoir help you deal with your past?

It was closure for me. That part of my life is past and I am now in the present and plan to stay there.

 

  • How easy/difficult was it to write it?

There were days I had to walk away from my computer. It was difficult reliving some of the tough times but I don’t regret writing the book.

 

  • What are your hobbies?

Reading (obviously), swimming, and watching reality TV – some trashy. It’s my vice. I can’t help it!

 

  • What led to law as a career choice?

I have always loved the law but I never thought I was smart enough to get into law school. When I started disliking my career in the non-profit sector, I thought I might as well take the LSAT and see what happens. I passed and was offered admission to two good law schools here in Michigan.

 

  • How do you manage your time around work, your daughter and writing?

Luckily, I’m my own boss so I can make my own schedule. Plus, Madelyne is in pre-school full time. But when she comes home, I put all of my work away and spend time with her.

 

  • What message would you like to share with the readers?

One – If you have postpartum depression, don’t feel ashamed to seek treatment.

Second – Emotional abuse is a form of domestic violence. Those of you who are in that type of relationship need to seek help right away.

Connect with Megan:

www.megancyrulewski.com

twitter: @MeganCyrulewski

Death by Didgeridoo by Barbara Venkataraman

21899943

Synopsis:

Reluctant lawyer, Jamie Quinn, still reeling from the death of her mother, is pulled into a game of deception, jealousy, and vengeance when her cousin, Adam, is wrongfully accused of murder. It’s up to Jamie to find the real murderer before it’s too late. It doesn’t help that the victim is a former rock star with more enemies than friends, or that Adam confessed to a murder he didn’t commit.

 

 

 

 

About the author:

Barbara Venkataraman is an attorney and mediator specializing in family law. She is the author of “The Fight for Magicallus,” a children’s fantasy, “If you’d Just Listened to Me in the First Place,” a humorous short story and two books of humorous essays: “I’m Not Talking about You, Of Course,” and “A Trip to the Hardware Store & Other Calamities,” which are part of an ongoing series entitled “Quirky Essays for Quirky People.”

Her latest works are: “Death by Didgeridoo,” and “The Case of the Killer Divorce,” both Jamie Quinn mysteries.”

 

My thoughts:

This is a relatively short story with a simple but interesting plot. Jamie Quinn, a lawyer is forced to finally come out of her depression to defend her cousin who has been accused of murder. It is up to her to find out the truth and prove that he is innocent even though he confessed to the murder. Jamie takes the help of a private investigator whom she had helped at the time of his divorce. Jamie has no experience of being a defense lawyer but that doesn’t stop her from trying.

The story is well-written, and though it could have been developed some more, it neatly ties up all the loose ends. It is a quick read and is entertaining. This book is definitely worth a read for those who like short murder mysteries.