Book Review: Three Voices by Nora Sarel

About the Book:

Three Voices

History always comes full circle

Whether she was hiding in an oven or the forest, in the monastery or in the cellar, Lena has been followed by one thing: loneliness. Now an elderly woman with nothing but her memories to guide her – she embarks on a journey to unravel the truth of her past, once and for all.

You have never read a story quite like this. Based on real events, Three Voices illustrates the trauma and relief of a woman escaping the atrocities of the Holocaust, traveling the world and eventually reclaiming her childhood. This incredible tale, pieced together from three unique perspectives, weaves past, present and future into a heart-wrenching experience that will change you.
Watch Lena take her life back

Lena remembers everything from her childhood. She doesn’t know that her whole life is about to be turned upside down as she comes face-to-face with another Lena. A once-in-a-lifetime meeting between the two Lena’s and the town’s priest sends shockwaves that reverberate through the truth that was known to her.

My Thoughts:

Three Voices portrays the horrifying life and trauma of a woman during the Holocaust and her journey as she tries to put it behind her. The story is told in three parts, bringing together the past, present and future, creating links that the woman was unaware of and exposing some truths that were hidden.

The story is brings out the harsh conditions, the way of life and the hardships people faced at the time of the Holocaust. In the first part, we take a journey with Lena as she shows us a glimpse into her childhood and years of growing up. A child, forced to grow up and act mature right from the age of 3, Lena deals with hiding, secrecy, living away from her parents and changes in faith. The main question that comes up as a part of this story is the question of faith and religion, how the mind processes it and how it affects people.

At times it is difficult to follow the story as it is narrated without a clear distinction in who is really talking to the reader. It becomes confusing to separate the information until later on, in the last part, when the rest of the story unravels. The character profile of the “other Lena” is confusing and not very clear. The story of the priest and the truth he finally brings out ensures that the reader has the entire story by the end of the book. A lot of repetition of points, especially to re-enforce how the protagonist was forced to grow up very soon, diluted the effect and seriousness of the overall theme.

Overall, the story is a decent read for those who enjoy stories based on historical events and the reader will definitely feel the sadness and effect of the events as Lena sets out to rediscover and reclaim her past.