Book Review: The Photograph by Debbie Rix

A special shout-out to Bookouture and NetGalley for providing me with this copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

About the Book:

Italy, 1958: Rachael is a young widow with a small child. After a lifetime of running for survival, of not knowing who to trust and where to call home, she finds herself in a place of safety. On a sun-drenched Italian island for one carefree summer the troubles of her past fade away and she falls in love. But will Rachael’s new-found happiness bring her further heartache?

England, 2017: Sophie has a handsome husband, a gorgeous house in the English countryside and a successful career as an anthropologist. But the one thing she longs for is a baby of her own. As she struggles to conceive, cracks begin to appear in her marriage. So Sophie throws herself into her work and tries to seek comfort in childhood memories of her beloved grandmother Rachael.

One afternoon, Sophie finds a forgotten letter and an exquisite silk bracelet hidden in Rachael’s old writing desk. Intrigued, she begins to unravel the extraordinary story of her grandmother’s past – and a secret that has the power to change everything…

The Photograph is an utterly beautiful and compelling story of love, loss and a family secret spanning generations.

My Thoughts:

The Photograph is the spell-binding journey of two women, generations apart, and their stories of love, loss and life. The story alternates between Sophie’s life and experiences in the current day, and those of Rachael, almost 60 years ago.

Sophie is dealing with the struggle to conceive, yearning so much for a child that she does not pay much attention to how the people around her are dealing with things. She is a wonderful person at heart, but fails to see how her obsession affects her husband. At the brink of losing her marriage entirely, the husband and wife duo are confronted with a lot of decisions and forced to deal with their emotions. The best part of Sophie’s story is her family, who is her support system, but who also act as voices of reason when required.

More than 60 years ago, Rachael, Sophie’s grandmother loses her own mother, her husband and is forced to flee her home with her father so as not to get caught. In the midst of all this, she finds herself pregnant. As the father-daughter duo’s journey continues west, they end up in England where her father takes up teaching anthropology at the university.

Rachael fills her time and also builds bonds with the owner of the house they are staying at. As time passes, they move to Italy for almost a year so that her father can lead a dig and document the findings. What follows is a life of sun, some laughter and a passionate love that Rachael develops for a local of the island. However, the main part of her story comes from not being able to pursue this relationship and moving back home.

Rachael’s life is filled with a lot of loss and tragedy, but through all this emerges a strong willed woman who raises two children by herself and lives to see her grandchildren grow up. A quiet but dependable presence in their lives, no-one knows that she harbors a strong secret about her life and her son’s.

Sophie, in a bid to connect with her grandmother, while moving her writing desk from the attic to the living room, discovers a false back. This leads to the discovery of a photograph, the very photograph that the title refers to! What follows is a family holiday to Italy where Sophie sets out to discover the truth behind the photograph. This leads Sophie to uncover a deeply hidden truth that would change her mother and uncle’s lives forever.

The story is gripping and will keep the reader hooked until the very end. Set against some amazing backdrops, the authors ensures to describe each place with great detail, it feels as though you are also there. The emotions are many and the reader will experience them all along with the characters. The author brings out the repercussions of keeping secrets but at the same time she shows us the reasoning behind it and how it might have been necessary. Times change, the world changes and so does people’s perception of things. A compelling story, The Photograph is a must read!

Book Review: Alpha Kaden by Midika Crane

Alpha Kaden was first put up on Wattpad. The popularity of the book and it’s author led to Inkitt picking the book up for publication. It is slated to release on May17th 2017.

I was provided with a complimentary copy by Inkitt in exchange for an honest review.

About the Book:

Alpha Kaden

“Lock your doors. Hold them tight. Close your windows. Every night. Don’t go out, in case he’s there. Always live in total fear.”

Everyone knows of Alpha Kaden, a man of twisted riddles and cryptic puzzles. His identity is one of them. His touch, another. He is feared throughout all 13 packs for his reputation of stealing young women out of their beds. And tonight he has come to steal Mara to make her a player in his wicked game.

But when Mara discovers the truth behind his sadistic mind games everything changes and she finds herself questioning what is real, and what is not. Mara always assumed her mate would be a man from her own pack. A good man. Not a sadistic, sinful Alpha named Kaden.

My Thoughts:

 I’ve picked  up a book in the supernatural genre after a very long time and it felt good to read this one. I particularly enjoy a lot of the books that are written on Wattpad and am very happy that this one is going to be published!

The story follows Mara, a werewolf from the Purity Pack, who gets kidnapped by Alpha Kaden. Alpha Kaden of the Vengeance Pack has a reputation that’s worse that just bad. With this idea in mind, Mara slowly comes to know who he really is and as the story unfolds, we come across a plot that is far deeper than a simple romance story. Many of the characters we encounter along the way, with Mara, are delightful and likable, while some we come to dislike.

The story is well written and has all elements of a romantic thriller. The focus is on so many things which makes it worth the read. The story behind Mara’s mate and how they find each other forms an integral part of the plot along with the many hidden truths that unravel. A story worth reading for all fans of the supernatural!

Book Review: The Gauguin Connection by Estelle Ryan

Book Blurb:

The Gauguin Connection (Genevieve Lenard, #1)

Murdered artists. Masterful forgeries. Art crime at its worst.
As an insurance investigator and world renowned expert in nonverbal communication, Dr Genevieve Lenard faces the daily challenge of living a successful, independent life. Particularly because she has to deal with her high functioning Autism. Nothing – not her studies, her high IQ or her astounding analytical skills – prepared her for the changes about to take place in her life. It started as a favour to help her boss’ acerbic friend look into the murder of a young artist, but soon it proves to be far more complex. Forced out of her predictable routines, safe environment and limited social interaction, Genevieve is thrown into exploring the meaning of friendship, expanding her social definitions, and for the first time in her life be part of a team in a race to stop more artists from being murdered.
My Thoughts:
I picked up this book not quite sure what to expect. The synopsis speaks of an plot filled with action and some rather interesting characters. At first I was confused and the story seemed to move at a very slow pace. As I continued reading, however, the pace of the story seemed to pick up. The story has a good plot and well developed characters. However, Genevieve is portrayed as a perfect human being as well as highly intelligent. In some ways it is a little scary that someone can be that perfect, but overall, she does fit into the concept and the story well. Her carefully constructed routine comes crashing down when she is asked to consult on a case being investigated upon by her boss’ friend. This is followed by her encounter with and the introduction to our other protagonist, a thief who is now trying to find those behind the same murders. Working together, after slowly gaining Genevieve’s trust, they work to uncover the truth. What follows is a race against time to solve the mystery and prevent any more deaths.
After a while, the plot’s pace increases some and it becomes quite interesting. The author uses Genevieve’s condition very well and demonstrates her behaviour and that of the people around her as a result of this. The author also brings out the contrast in natures of the main protagonists and we watch as Genevieve grows from her usual recluse self to someone slightly more comfortable around people (within reason and some limits of course!). Though it feels as though a lot of emphasis is given to this and many a time there is repetition of things that have already been mentioned and explained, one can overlook this and read on without much discomfort. Also brace yourselves for a glimpse into the artistic world and some insight into certain artists and their style of painting. Overall this is a decent, one time read!